wake up

to a sunrise

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

If I can offer you one tip for advice when it comes to being a morning person, read the following, wake up with the rising sun. There is something magical about seeing the sun rise. The sun rising is the dawn of a new day and it symbolizes a new beginning and youth. Try to take on a new beginning with the sunrise, you won’t regret it.

This morning, I watched the sunrise in Miami and it was a beautiful sight. My sunrise, fortunately, was a view of the skyline. Tomorrow, I will be out on the beach reining in a new day with the sun.

Truthfully, I know it sounds corny, but wake up when the sun is rising. Try it, just once. It will turn you into a morning person but there are perks to come like seeing the city come to life, having more hours to do things in a day and just taking a minute to enjoy the calmness.

life is short

no one will get out alive, remember that

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

Time seems to be the killer of all things. We are constantly complaining that there are not enough hours in the day to get everything done, but I don’t believe that. 24 hours in a day is just right. Once you factor everything in: 8 hours of work, an hour commute, grooming, sleeping, eating and exercise, what more do you need?

In this day in age, we need to learn how to prioritize. We need to set an agenda and we need to sit to it.

Take a look at this post from Sam Davidson. He’s preaching exactly what I am talking about. You will find that 24 hours in a day is just enough when you start to put the clutter behind you.

What You Don’t Have Time For

You know what you don’t have time for.

Don’t let other people convince you otherwise based on the whims of any given news cycle, their personal agenda, or some prejudiced notion of what you ought to make time for.

You don’t have time to discuss Duck Dynasty. You don’t have time for someone else’s poor planning. You don’t have time to fix it, so let’s all get it right the first time. You don’t have time for a distraction brought on by cheap technology. You don’t have time for anything that doesn’t align with what you value, who you love, and where you want to go.

There is simply too much good work left to be done. And there are fewer and fewer hours in which to do it.

Set the agenda. Don’t let someone else set it for you.

turn your clocks

don’t forget to turn your clocks back

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

Daylight Saving Time is when the days become short and we are closer to the Winter Solstice. Honestly before I decided to write about Daylight Saving Time I couldn’t tell you anything about it. After much research, I now have a grasp on why we have Daylight Saving.

Daylight Saving Time was instituted in the United States during World War I in order to save energy for war production by taking advantage of the later hours of daylight between April and October. During World War II the federal government again required the states to observe the time change. Between the wars and after World War II, states and communities chose whether or not to observe Daylight Saving Time. Congress passed the Uniform Time Act, which standardized the length of Daylight Saving Time in 1996.

In 2005 Congress passed the Energy Policy Act and since 2007 Daylight Saving Time is  four weeks longer. This Act extended Daylight Saving Time by four weeks from the second Sunday of March to the first Sunday of November, with the hope that it would save 10,000 barrels of oil each day through reduced use of power by businesses during daylight hours. As a result of this act, it is difficult to determine energy savings from Daylight Saving Time and based on factors, it is possible that little or no energy is saved by Daylight Saving Time.

Most states and a few countries will turn their clocks back on November 3, 2013 with the exception of Hawaii and Arizona because those states do not practice Daylight Savings Time. This means that we gain (not lose) an hour when we turn our clocks back an hour to 1:00 a.m. when our clocks reach 2 a.m. on Sunday. A helpful way to remember whether to set our clocks ahead or behind one hour during the Daylight Savings Time change for Fall 2013 is to “Fall Back” and “Spring Ahead.”

Did you know it’s actually Daylight Saving Time not Daylight Savings Time? It’s become so widely known as Daylight Savings Time in the US that no one makes the correction.

Fact: Only TWO countries: Kyrgyzstan and Iceland  observe year-round Daylight Saving Time.

Daylight Saving Time will end on Sunday, November 3, 2013 at 2 a.m. in the United States. It will resume on March 9, 2014 at 2 a.m.