pieces of advice

Traveling is something really special. There is something nostalgic about it. When traveling, you experience culture, indexfood and people. Traveling is about the adventure just as much as it is about finding yourself. With that, I want to introduce you to Amanda. She is one of my sorority sisters who has an awesome job; not only does she encounter new lives an save people she travels. Amanda is a traveling nurse and her life is filled with many new experiences. Below Amanda writes about a few things that resonate with her and I think these things will resonate with any 20-somethings. After reading this blog post, I hope you leave with this: travel much, travel often – make it happen no matter the cost.

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

Pass It On

guest blog presented by: Amanda Bentz
You can find Amanda on Twitter: @AmandaRoseBentz; insta: amanda_rose_021, make sure you follow her

“The only thing to do with good advice is to pass it on. It is never of any use to oneself.” – Oscar Wilde

I recently came across an article online titled “100 Pieces of Advice from 100-Year-Olds.” Intrigued, I found myself reading the collection of genuine, honest and somewhat humorous pieces of advice gathered from a collection of people who have lived a century. After reading advice on exercise, diets, marriage, pets, money, jobs and attitude, I paused on one that resonated with me.

 “Travel while you’re young and able. Don’t worry about the money, just make it work. Experience is far more valuable than money will ever be.”

Traveling has always been a desire of mine. I will always appreciate my roots and my small town upbringing, but I can’t help but wonder what else is out there? What am I missing if I pass up an opportunity to travel to a new location? This fueled my dream to become a travel nurse and relocate to a new hospital every three months. However, this form of travel doesn’t require extra money to be spent on my end. It’s the traveling that I want to do while I’m in a new location that costs money. As a 23-year-old with no dependents and a stable income, I feel like I am ‘young and able’ to travel. But shouldn’t I be focusing on paying off my student loans and saving money for my future?

Budgeting money is a stress that many people deal with. It’s a necessity to thrive in today’s economy. Everyone treats it differently, but I think it’s safe to say that it’s always a worry. We spend a lot of our money on tangible things that we use every day that benefit us such as groceries, clothing, gas, transportation, heat, cable, internet, etc. These are things most people consider a necessity. But traveling? That’s something that people can do without. What do you get out of traveling anyways? A week here, an extended weekend there – what’s the purpose?

“Experience is far more valuable than money will ever be.” This is my favorite part of the advice. Experience is one thing that can never be taken away from you. By traveling to new locations, we experience new things. Food, people, culture, climate, lifestyles, history – the list goes on and on. I believe that experiencing these things opens your mind and allows you to grow and develop as a person. That is something money cannot buy. That’s why I think this man is advising us to ‘make it work’. How do you do that? Well, I challenge you to figure it out.

“Now more than ever do I realize that I will never be content with a sedentary life, that I will always be haunted by thoughts of a sun-drenched elsewhere.” – Isabelle Eberhardt

a mentor

Matt is a very lucky guy in many aspects. One in particular he’s been blessed with having not one, but two exceptional mentors in his short lived career. I’ve heard countless stories of both mentors and they not only are mentors to Matt while he was working with them, but they still contact one another. To me, an awesome mentor is someone who is trusted and someone you can talk about about more than your career and professional life. I want a mentor who I trust and can go to for advice across many subjects. One day, I hope we all have an opportunity to have mentors (or be mentors) like the one Matt writes about in his guest blog post below.

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

what makes a mentor

guest blog presented by: Matthew D. Shalbrack
You can find Matt on Twitter: @hamsterjockey; insta: hamsterjockey, make sure you follow him!

By definition, a mentor is “an experienced or trusted adviser” or even more descriptive, a “an experienced person in a company, college, or school who trains and counsels new employees or students.”

In my short 23 years, I’ve had two different types of mentors, both of whom were bosses of mine at one point in my career.

Both of these individuals, who shall remain nameless, are mentors of mine for different reasons. I think that aspect of this story is very important because I think there are some very important criteria that must be met in order to be considered someone’s “mentor.”

The biggest thing for me is that a person must trust you to do your job correctly just as much as you trust them to be fair to you when being your superior. It means relying on you to do not only the miniscule tasks, but the hard and challenging tasks as well. At the same time, it means that this person doesn’t act like a boss, they act as a friend until you screw up and they need to lay the hammer down, which they don’t have any problem doing. Another important thing that a “mentor” has in my opinion is that they trust your judgment, 100%, no questions asked.

One of the other important things that I find to be a characteristic of both of my mentors is that they bring out good qualities, the ones that you were hired for, in you to use them to not only help you grow, but to help the organization/company grow as well. They take all of your strengths and help you make them grow even stronger while taking your weaknesses and help you grow them into strengths. This person also always wants you to succeed no matter what, even if it’s for a different company. In turn, that desire for success applies to them from you, too.

Finally, this person always has time for you, no matter if it’s on the clock or off the clock. Whether it be sitting in their office after hours for 15 minutes extra or going out for a dinner to discuss not only work-related things, but to discuss life in general. That’s the type of mentor I want.

I’ve been lucky this far in my career where I’ve had two people who have fulfilled all of those things and more for me. They’ve allowed me to grow, to harness my talents, help pinpoint my weaknesses and teach me how to fix them, all while not being afraid to keep me informed on the things that I need to work on or call me out when I screw up. People like this are irreplaceable in both life and the workplace. If you’ve met someone like this, a person that you can really call a “mentor,” you’re lucky. Those friendships will last a lifetime. If you haven’t yet, keep your head up because you’re bound to meet someone like this.

window, aisle or middle seat?

window seat me!

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

When flying there is nothing better than getting a window seat. I love flying. I love the window seat and when you put the two of them together, the flight is such a wonderful experience.

Having the window seat isn’t just about being comfortable during the flight and having something to lean on. Sure it is about the view, but it’s not that either. It’s about the experience. Being a window-seater is a romantic and hopeful thing.  With the window seat- the view is inspiring.  An unfortunate account which I have run into a few times is when people who grab the window seat, pull down the shade and go to sleep, depriving the rest of us of any possible view.  if you don’t want the window, let me sit there.

It’s been rumored that window seats will soon be considered premiums, therefore making them more expensive and an extra charge when choosing the window. Honestly, if that ever becomes the case, I would have no problem with paying for a window seat. I want to sit next to the window, I am passionate about it. The window hypes me for my travel and it’s one of the best places I do my thinking. When you’re 30,000 feet up in the air just flying– looking out of the window is one of the most serene places to be.

I cannot wait to get on that plane back to DC and to cozy up in my window-seat. The window seat will be the perfect ending to a wonderful trip. In the time being check out these 100 incredible in-flight photos (I would just like to note that 3 of them are Wisconsin!).

What are you? Do you prefer one seat over another?