challenging “standards”

who sets those anyway?

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

I know this article is a little old and I’ve been meaning to write a really thought provoking blog about this article, or at least highlighting it but since January nothing has come to me. Thanks to Delta Phi Epsilon, one of their philanthropies is ANAD, and since college the topic of body image has always been on the forefront. I wanted to get the word out about this awesome new campaign and rather than writing something you don’t want to read, let me just give you the facts, how’s that?

Body image is huge for both men and women. When you see a photo in a magazine or on a billboard it’s more than likely “touched up”. Airbrushing is something that is detrimental to our society. We need to stop comparing ourselves. We need to put them emphasis on health rather than skinny or fat.

Back in January, aerie announced that the ads are “challenging supermaerie 1odel standards by featuring unretouched models in their latest collection of bras, undies and apparel.” Sure, one campaign isn’t solve the complicated of an individual’s self-esteems and images of women in media, but we have to start somewhere. The fact that one brand, aerie, is now showing off their cute bras and undies on bodies with real rolls, lines and curves, is certainly going to help.

american eagle unretouched

So, what do you think about the ad?

Always, remember that beauty is in the eye of the beholder and you, my dear, are beautiful. The real you is sexy, don’t think otherwise.

DIMES

a HSO!

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

It’s always nice to see things you start get tweaked for the better and used on a national level. DIMES for DPhiE is one of those things for me. Back in the Spring of 2010, I created a fundraiser for my Chapter called Lincoln for Lincoln. Essentially, the fundraiser goes as follows, you write an ask letter and attach a penny (Lincoln) and you are asking for a $5.00 bill (Lincoln) in exchange. I digress, DIMES 4 DPhiE (D4D) is a fundraising initiative held during the month of March to commemorate our Founders, the DIMES: Dorothy, Ida, Minna, Eve and Sylvia. The numbers came back and we rocked it this year! The text below is an email I woke up to this morning. Congratulations Delta Phi Epsilon! 

As DIMES for DPhiE has come to a close, we would like to thank those who participated and donated for their generous contributions and commitment to the Educational Foundation of Delta Phi Epsilon.

In the 31 days of March, collegians, alumnae and friends of DPhiE were able to come together and raise over $102,528.15, far exceeding our goal of $75,000!

This support allow the Foundation to inspire and empower our sisterhood to engage in a lifetime of leadership and service. We truly couldn’t do it without sisters like you!

Sororally,
Lindsay Smith
Development Coordinator

p.s. If you didn’t have an opportunity to participate in D4D, we will be unveiling a new program this May. Keep an eye on the Foundation Facebook page for more information!

founder’s day

 here’s to 97 years

 you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

97 years ago today, five incredibly determined and forward thinking young women founded an organization that continues to strive for the equality, innovation and empowerment of women! Today, I celebrate every sister past, present and future. Today, I thank you for your impact, contribution and dedication!

imageToday, Delta Phi Epsilon celebrate their Founders. I’m lucky enough to be one of those women paying homage to the founding ladies of DPhiE. Today, we hope that you take a moment to honor those sisters who have come before us and the future sisters who will be carrying on our traditions.

a heartwarming surprise

the super bowl

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

I was really intrigued after I saw that my sorority, Delta Phi Epsilon, made it on to TSM (Total Sorority Move). After opening the article, I realized it was a truly amazing heartwarming story about the sister of DPhiE (UMich). They surprised their house mom with tickets to the Super Bowl!

These are the things that I miss the most about my undergrad. To me, DPhiE was (and still is) my home away from home. TSM puts it the best: If your sorority house is your home away from home, then your sorority house mom is your momma away from momma. We’re at the age where we start to realize just how nurturing, selfless, and loving (albeit crazy) our mothers are. We’ve also started to realize how we’ve even taken them for granted. Every one in 50 or so times, most of us will try and give back.

When we give back…we really give back. Watch this clip, it will explain the immense gratitude and appreciation I have towards my fellow sisters.

dreaming

catching her dreams

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

As a Deepher, I love promoting other Deephers. And as a dreamer, I love promoting other people’s dreams. I stumbled upon this new blog and I knew it was fate. Catching Her Dreams is a blog run by two Deephers: Jesica Shipley and Colleen Ann McNally.

From what I’ve gathered, these two ambitious women started a journey to pursue their dreams. These women encourage each other as well as many others to chase after their dreams. Jesica and Colleen started a blog that documents how they chase after their dreams and the lessons they learn along the way. These women show that we can do anything we want. They have an inspirational story and they are courageous enough to share it with the world. Ladies, keep your courage and your dreams!

And in the end we realize a few things are true. If you are a dreamer, you will understand the following. Dreams are attainable no matter how big or small. You cannot tell people your dreams, you must show them. And above all, my wish for you is that one day you find the place where your dreams collide with reality.

i’m so over it

then why did you join?

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

ΔΦΕ has been a huge part of my life for the past five years and it will continue to be in the forefront of my life. Rushing a Greek organization and the New Member Process are very important steps in any Greek’s life. During these two chapters, you learn that being Greek and being part of an ever growing organization isn’t for four years, rather it’s for life. In my experience, accountability is always a downfall of a sister’s membership. Just like an organization or any activity in life, if you put more into something, the better the results.

Why yes, that is Macklemore and Ryan Lewis throwing up the Unicorn horn!

Why yes, that is Macklemore and Ryan Lewis throwing up the Unicorn horn!

While I was an active sister, I believe that I was the epitome of a “sorority girl” (loyal, professional, high standards, philanthropic, confident, accountable, lively and adventurous) and I still am. You can find me melding into that stereotype because I’m a Vera carrying, bow wearing, pearl sporting, monogram obsessed, southern hair kind of girl and those are an everyday occurrence. Yes, it’s my style and who I am but that’s because of my fondness for my Deephers. Being a Deepher has become such an important thing in my life. I could never imagine uttering the words, “I’m so over the sorority thing” as an active or now as an Alumnae. In the past day, I was sent the article below three times by different women and it’s worth reading, especially if you are Greek. I hope Emily Johnson inspires you and lights a fire under your ass if you are one of those “I’m so over the sorority thing” girls.

The text below is from Emily Johnson’s blog which you can find here. A HUGE shout out to Emily for taking the courage to write this. YITS!

“I’m So Over the Sorority Thing”

When I became a member of my sorority I felt in my heart that I was joining something bigger than myself.

But then along the way you tend to forget.

You forget the meaning of sisterhood because you live in such close proximity to your sisters and they inevitably get on your last nerve.

You forget the bonds you have with these women because boys, frat parties, and cooler decorating become more important.

You forget that you genuinely share an interest with some of the women in your chapter because they can be catty, mean-spirited, quirky, or downright weird. (But you know what, they’re family- and all families have the eccentric one, the dramatic one, the loud one, the quiet one, the one who is MIA majority of the time, and that’s what makes a family interesting. It makes a family a family. )

And then you graduate, and then you really forget.

You lose touch with many of your sisters, the women who were supposed to be your life long friends.

You forget what appealed to you about this chapter, this sisterhood, this bond, because life got in the way and clouded your memory. You look back and it’s hard to see past the time you were wronged, the time a sister wasn’t there for you or any other dramatic moment that redefined your perception of a sorority.

You forget how incredibly special and unique the bond was with your big or your little because you’re older now and it is not socially acceptable to go around calling a twenty-something year old friend, “big”, “mom”, “dot”, or “little”.

In essence you simply forget. There are more important things in life than a sorority. How juvenile.

But then, there are times when your faith in sisterhood and its everlasting bonds is revived.

It’s in times of need, when you see a sister is hurting that you can’t help it -you want to be there for her in some capacity.  Because no matter how hard you try to dismiss it- that bond remains.

When there is a loss, a death, a tragedy we feel compelled to reach out.

That’s lovely.

That’s what you should do.Don’t be so foolish as to think it’s special that you give of your time, your energy, or your love to a dear friend (or even someone who is practically a stranger) when they need it most. It’s what you should do. Not just as a sister, but as a fellow human being.

But there is also something else you should do.

As a sorority woman it’s difficult for people to understand why this silly little chapter means so much to you. Hell, sometimes it’s even difficult for you to remember why this chapter means, or meant, so much to you.

So the next time you find yourself saying or thinking, “I’m so over the sorority thing.” Think about a time in your life when you may really need your sisters and they’ll be compelled to help. You would want that… wouldn’t you?

Think about the time you were a brand new member and were a little intimidated to go to formal but one of the older girls reached out to you and made you feel welcome.

Think about the time at recruitment when you were a senior and it was your last preference ceremony and you balled like a baby and couldn’t explain why.

Think about being a younger member or as a PNM going through rush and seeing the older members cry like babies and think, “I want that. I want something to mean that much to me.”

Think about the night when everyone was going out but you and another sister you barely knew stayed in and watched movies, talked, or went and got froyo instead. Maybe you became best friends, or maybe you didn’t. But it was somehow special.

Think about how stressful it was when big and little time came around- what with all the baskets, spending more time crafting than studying and spending way too much money on ridiculous decorations that you know won’t be acceptable after college but you make them anyway. You invest so much time making sure everything is perfectly painted, bedazzled and glitterfied- only to find remnants of glitter when you move out of your dorm room or apartment, months or years after the fact. (Any sorority woman can attest to the fact that glitter is indeed the herpes of craft supplies.)

I guess what I’m trying to say is this..

Treat your sister, every sister, even the sister you have nothing in common with, with kindness, respect, and acknowledgment that they are of value. Always.

Because, after all, these are more than friends- they’re sisters. You don’t have to like them or hangout with them everyday, but you have all collectively agreed there is a unique bond that you share and thus, you are innately required to care.

It’s easy to forget and let harbored negativity and grudges cloud what was once a very special and important part of your life. Never forget the good times and the genuine spirit that at one point in time  made you choose to become part of a sisterhood. You needed this and they needed you. Regardless of what has happened since, that will always be a large part of your life. Be grateful you were so lucky to have felt that. Not many people do.

We all still need each other.

Even after we graduate.

Even after we get married.

Even after we have children and our college days are but a distant memory.

Instead of holding on to the dramatics of life, choose to remember that feeling you had when it first hit you. When you for once felt like this was where you belonged.

When you start to forget, just remember…

You promised to “forget-me-not”.

philanthropy

involvement with The National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, Inc.® (ANAD)

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

One huge draw to Delta Phi Epsilon was it’s philanthropies. Delta Phi Epsilon has two organizations that we are involved with philanthropically, ANAD and CFF. Each year, DPhiE tries to out-do themselves when it comes to the events, promotion and raising money. The promotion of philanthropy and these events become bigger and better as the years go by. 1dc44b7d12bc528f5829f51ffb288c33

Sororities (and Fraternities) support a wide range of charitable causes across the nation. Most make an annual, national commitment to the same cause . A basic tenet of all National Panhellenic Conference member groups is service, a word that most sorority women take seriously from college well into their retirement years. NPC’s 26 member sororities, Alumnae Panhellenic associations and College Panhellenic associations have the freedom to choose how they spend their service time. “The opportunity for wide and wise human service, through mutual respect and helpfulness, is the tenet by which we strive to live,” according to the NPC Creed.

DPhiE now recognizes ANAD twice, once in fall semester and once in spring semester, by the sisters.  ANAD advocates for the development of healthy attitudes, bodies, and behaviors.  The organization promotes eating disorder awareness, prevention and recovery through supporting, educating, and connecting individuals, families and professionals.

Today is our third annual Deepher Dude (man) pageant. All proceeds go to ANAD. I couldn’t be more excited to be back at Winona State for this monumental moment for my Chapter (Alpha Tau). Participating in a cause that is so near to my heart is exciting. I am excited for my Chapter to woo me with their knowledge, grace, hilarity, and creativity.  The toughest challenge is getting people to an event, but once they are there– sit back, relax, because these girls are going to stomp the stage. I have a great feeling about this Deepher Dude event.

Remember, beauty isn’t a mold; break it.

big_thumbnail

the epitome of a crafternoon

sipping & painting

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

Four and a half years ago I made one of the best decisions of my life: rushing a sorority. Upon rushing, I didn’t hold Greeks to a high regard, nor did I understand what being Greek was all about, and worst of all I judged, classified, and stereotyped all of them. Not until my sister invited me down for family weekend with her sorority (Chi Omega) I didn’t get it. I didn’t understand why you would essentially “pay for your friends”. After that picnic and family outing something clicked, soon after I learned that my Orientation Leader in college was Greek and she was a Deepher.

Four and a half years ago, I rushed Delta Phi Epsilon, and it was the best decision I’ve ever made. Since graduating college and being on my own, I was worried that I would lose my DPhiE roots. I made it a priority that I wouldn’t cut those ties. Being Greek isn’t about four years, it’s for life, and frankly it really bothers me when people now will say oh, I was a so-and-so…no, just because you’re not an active doesn’t mean you are not a part of that organization. You most certainly are. I forever and always will be a Deepher.

With all of that being said, yesterday was a perfect day with my DPhiE alumnae sisters. A year and a half ago I co-founded the Delta Phi Epsilon DC Area Alumnae Association, and I couldn’t be more thrilled with the outcome so far. Yesterday, was a lovelycrafts afternoon spent doing something new and something old. We put together our DPhiE past with the present. We crafted, we drank, we reminisced and laughed.  Having the opportunity to meet and connect with such awesome women is something I will always be forever grateful for. These women truly brighten my day yesterday and really helped me out when I was in a funk.

Crafting is one of the most enjoyable things, it’s such a great stress reviler, and not to mention it’s a creative outlet! A crafternoon with champagne and wine glasses, was an awesome treat! Sure we don’t get together all the time, but when we do, you better believe we are going to have a great time and not let a moment pass us by!

As it’s been said buniefore: “People ask why I am in a sorority and I try to explain all the things a sorority is that they cannot see. A sorority is more than letters on a sweatshirt, I say. More than traditional songs, a gold pin, rituals, and obligation, or a way of life. A sorority is learning about people, a sorority is giving without expecting a return. A sorority is earning respect from others, as well as for yourself. A sorority will not solve all your problems. But I have made good friends and found confidence there to help me take life one step at a time.” And you know what all of this just goes to show,  you get what you put in– so maybe it’s true, maybe “paying for your friends” gets you those awesome gems and diamonds in the ruff that you wouldn’t have found otherwise.

My heΔrt. My sφul. My lifE. #ΔφΕ